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Worship Through Drama Ryllis Clair Alexander

Worship Through Drama

Ryllis Clair Alexander

Published March 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781406777246
Paperback
364 pages
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 About the Book 

WORSHIP THROUGH DRAMA by RYLLIS CLAIR ALEXANDER and OMAR PANCOAST GOSLIN 1930 Harper Brothers Publishers NEW YORK and LONDON CONTENTS FOREWORD vii PREFACE by Harry Emerson Fosdick ix THE METHOD A Definition of Drama xiii The Dramatic Element inMoreWORSHIP THROUGH DRAMA by RYLLIS CLAIR ALEXANDER and OMAR PANCOAST GOSLIN 1930 Harper Brothers Publishers NEW YORK and LONDON CONTENTS FOREWORD vii PREFACE by Harry Emerson Fosdick ix THE METHOD A Definition of Drama xiii The Dramatic Element in Worship xvii Producing the Dramatic Service xxi THE SERVICES I. FORGIVENESS The Lords Prayer by Francois Coppee 3 II. ST. FRANCIS Three scenes from the life of the Saint 2.7 III. THANKSGIVING An episodic presentation of Americas blessings and responsibilities 49 IV. THE CHRISTMAS STORY A dramatisation of the scriptural record from the Prophecy to the Great Command 71 vi CONTENTS V. THE OLD AND THE NEW A series of episodes showing evolution in religious thought 91 VI. PREEDOM An episodic presentation of man s struggle for freedom intellectual, social, political, and religious 115 VII. THE OTHER WISE MAN A dramatisation of the flory by Henry van Dyke 139 VIII. LIGHT He Came Seeing by Mary P. Hamlin 167 IX. PRIDE A dramatisation of Longfellows poem Robert of Sicily, from the Tales of a Wayside Inn 105 X. LOVE A dramatic version of Arthur Sullivan s oratorio, The Prodigal Son xi3 XI. ABRAHAM LINCOLN Three scenes from the play Abraham Lincoln, by John Drinkwater 2.79 XII. PRAYER An episodic service presenting an evolving conception of Prayer FOREWORD THIS volume is a collection of twelve services of worship as they have been presented at the Riverside Church, New York City. In these services, for the first time, drama has been used consistently as a medium of worship. Sunday after Sunday, for an entire year, those who have attended these services have been inspired and challenged by a real experience of worship. The enthusiastic response of thesecongregations has convinced the authors that drama, as a fine art, should be used in the program of worship of every church, and may be made as effective as the instruction of preaching or the ministry of music. In each service the dramatic material has been used in the presentation of some rentral theme, with hymns, scripture readings, and prayers in ceeping with that theme. In some instances a one-act play has Deen used 5 for others a series of episodes has served to develop he theme j again certain scenes have been adapted from a longer The volume has been made possible by the generosity of hose who have so graciously allowed their work to be included vlrs. Mary P. Hamlin, Mrs. Mary Aldis, Mr. Henry van Dyke, nd Mr. John Drinkwater. The authors are grateful to the editors f the Forum Magazine and to Mr. William C. White for the laterial used in the Russian episode in Service Number Six to he Oxford University Press for permission to use Gilbert Mur ays translation of the prayer to Zeus in Service Number Twelve 3 Doubleday, Doran and Company for permission to reprint the ndian prayer from The Indian How Book by Arthur C. Parker viii FOREWORD viii to Professor Ozora S. Davis and Mr. Frank Mason North for the use of their hymns to Mrs. George Sargent Burgess for per mission to reprint the hymn by her aunt, Katharine Lee Bates and finally, to Miss Caroline B. Parker of the Century Com pany for her cooperation in securing other hymn permissions. The authors wish to express their appreciation also to Mr. James Gould who has labored tirelessly to reproduce in the illustra tions scenes from the various services as accurately and sympa thetically as possible. For authenticity of costume inseveral in stances they are indebted to the Eaves Costume Company, New York City. August 14, 1930 New York City R. C. A. O. P. G. PREFACE THE characteristic Protestant tradition has centered its attention, so far as worship is concerned, upon a preaching service. The historic explanation of this fact can easily be given in terms of revolt against the older Roman habits of worship and the exigent need of a teaching ministry in the establishment of the new doc trine...